News

Supportive Partners Protect Relationship Quality in People with Depression or External Stress

couple sitting watching the sunset

New findings emerge from UMass Amherst newlyweds study

Having a responsive, supportive partner minimizes the negative impacts of an individual’s depression or external stress on their romantic relationship, according to research by a University of Massachusetts Amherst social psychologist.

Adult‐like abilities found in auditory processing system of zebra finch nestlings

Twitter thread on the latest paper from Katie Schroeder @katieschro8. Illustrations by Katie Schroeder

Baby songbirds already have a surprisingly well-developed auditory processing system! 
@HealeyLab and I are excited to share the first paper from my dissertation.
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/dneu.22802

​​​​​​​Nilanjana Buju Dasgupta receives Samuel F. Conti Faculty Fellowship Award

Buju DasguptaNilanjana Buju Dasgupta has received the 2021-2022 Samuel F. Conti Faculty Fellowship Award! Congratulations!

A University of Massachusetts Amherst Samuel F. Conti Faculty Fellowship provides faculty members with a unique opportunity to focus on their research or creative activities. These Fellowships are managed by the office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Engagement and provide a one-year release from teaching and service duties in addition to a cash award. Fellows are chosen based on their record of outstanding accomplishments in research and creative activity and on their potential for continued excellence, particularly with regard to the project that will be undertaken during the Fellowship period.

Faculty Donors Make $1.2 Million Gift to Create Professorship in Psychological and Brain Sciences at UMass Amherst

Robert Feldman
Robert Feldman

Robert Feldman and his wife, Katherine Vorwerk, support excellence at UMass

A new professorship in psychological and brain sciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has been established through a financial commitment of $1.2 million from Robert S. Feldman and his wife, Katherine E. Vorwerk.

Marcela Fernandez-Peters discusses the hearing spectrum of birds and humans

great horned owl

Marcela Fernandez-Peters, a post doctoral research associate in the Healey Lab, is quoted in a radio report exploring whether birds have a greater hearing spectrum than humans. She says that the hearing organs and brains of owls have “a lot of real estate dedicated” to hearing high frequencies, meaning that while they might not hear super high pitched sounds, they’re very good at hearing the frequencies they do hear. New Hampshire Public Radio

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