Ervin Staub, creator of the Active Bystandership for Law Enforcement (ABLE) program

In the Media

Ervin Staub, professor emeritus of psychological and brain sciences, is interviewed about the program he developed to teach police officers how to intervene in stopping unnecessary harmful behavior by fellow officers. Staub says he initiated this training after the police beating of Rodney King in 1991 and the Active Bystandership for Law Enforcement (ABLE) program he developed is now training more than 100 police departments. He says, “Having a law that requires intervention is not enough.” WBUR

Can police be taught to stop their own violence?
Boston’s department and others are adopting a peer-intervention training program. The ideas come from a UMass psychologist who survived the Holocaust, thanks to the help of others. The Boston Globe

An article about police departments across the country adopting the Active Bystandership for Law Enforcement (ABLE) project notes that it was developed from the research of Ervin Staub, professor emeritus of psychology and founder of the Psychology of Peace and Justice program. The Wall Street Journal